Versioning in data projects

Reproducibility is a pillar in science, and version control via git has been a blessing to it. For pure Software Engineering it works perfectly. However, machine learning projects are not just only about code, but rather also about the data. The same model trained with two distinct data sets can produce completely different results.

So it comes with no surprise when I stumble with csv files on git repos of data teams, as they struggle to keep track of code and metadata. However this cannot be done for today’s enormous datasets. I have seen several hacks to solve this problem, none of them bullet proof. This post is not about those hacks, rather about an open source solution for it: DVC.

dvc_flow_large

Let us exemplify by using a kaggle challenge: predicting house prices with Advanced Regression Techniques

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Getting through Deep Learning – CNNs (part 1)

The number of available open source libraries making Deep learning easier to use is spreading fast as hype continuous to build. However, without understanding the background principles, it just feels like poking around a black box.

In this post (or several, most likely) will try to give an introduction to Convolution Neural Networks (CNNs). Note that, for the sake of brevity, I assume that you already know the basics about Neural Networks. If not, I would suggest you go through the following introduction.

This post is part of a tutorial series:

  1. Getting through Deep Learning – CNNs (part 1)
  2. Getting through Deep Learning – TensorFlow intro (part 2)
  3. Getting through Deep Learning – TensorFlow intro (part 3)

Disclaimer: this post uses images and formulas from distinct sources. I would suggest to have a look over the complete list of sources at the end of the post, as usual.

Inspiration

In 1958 and 1959 David H. Hubel and Torsten Wiesel performed a series of experiments, whereby they concluded that many neurons in the visual cortex focus on a limited region in the vision field.

This insight provided the notion of a local receptive field – a narrow sub-region of what is available in the whole visual field which serves as input – thus giving rise for a different architecture than the previously fully connected neural network architecture.

Basics – Convolution Layer

The first thing to realize is that Convolution networks are simply the application of “mini-neural networks” to segments of input space. In the case of images, that results in that neurons in the first convolutional layer are not connected to every single pixel in their Receiptive Field (RF).  The following image (source) shows an illustration of how a a a convolution layer is built using an image from the famous MNIST dataset – whereby the goal consists in identifyying the digits from handwritten numbers pictures.

Cnn_layer

 

Continue reading “Getting through Deep Learning – CNNs (part 1)”